Talha Köse

Researcher, Strategy, İstanbul
A graduate of the Political Science and International Relations Department of Boğaziçi University, Mr. Köse received his MA in the Conflict Analyses and Solutions Program from Sabancı University. Köse holds a PhD from the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, with the thesis titled “Re-Negotiating Alevi Identity: Conflict and Cooperation Narratives and the Constitution of New Alevi Identity”. Köse worked as an RA at SETA and as a research coordinator later at SETA-Washington. Köse is currently a faculty member at Istanbul Şehir University.

Directors

  • In the summer of 2019, I had an opportunity to visit the western cities of Libya. As a group of researchers, we were trying to understand the dynamics of the complicated civil war in Libya.
  • The targeted killing of Qassem Soleimani, the commander of Iran's Quds Force, an elite unit of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), and the deputy chief of Hashd al-Shaabi forces in Iraq, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandisi, is a game-changer for Middle Eastern politics. Immediately after the attack that killed Soleimani, Iranian leadership threatened the U.S. and its allies in the region. Iran fired missiles at two American bases in Iraq in retaliation to the assassination of Soleimani. No casualties were declared in Iran's retaliatory attacks. Leaders of both countries escalated the tension, but they were careful not to let the crisis get out of control.
  • The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is going through a major structural transformation in the last decade. This transformation is closely related to the transformation of power balance in the global scene.
  • Another significant issue that is threatening the entire region is the escalating crisis in Libya.
  • A new alliance is forming in the Eastern Mediterranean Region aiming to strike against Turkey's rising influence and naval power in the region. Economic arguments are being used to form a political alliance against Turkey.