Libya’s difficult path to political stability

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The Libya Political Dialogue Forum (LPDF) road map proposed guidelines to remain in place until …

Bu Konuda Daha Fazla

  • The most unfortunate reaction to the made-up scandal came from Italy, whose recently appointed prime minister, Mario Draghi, made the following statement: 'I disagree with the way President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan treated Ursula. We must be frank with these dictators but, at the same time, cooperate with them for the sake of our nations’ interests.'

  • The wave of democratization, which began with the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia, took down the authoritarian leaders of Egypt, Libya and Yemen. Whereas the uprising in Bahrain was crushed thanks to Saudi Arabia’s military intervention, Iran and Russia ensured the survival of Bashar Assad’s regime in Syria.

  • French President Emanuel Macron has been trying to bring back France's shiny past and become the dominant European power, bypassing Germany, the continent's main heavyweight. He is also claiming a central position in the Eastern Mediterranean as well as in Western Africa. However, he follows an unusual policy in order to achieve his objectives.

  • Crisis at critical turning point, says head of UN Support Mission in Libya

  • Historically, Western governments prefer liberal values and principles in their foreign relations only when they enjoy a competitive advantage. When the governments experience crises and find themselves in a disadvantaged position, hatred, alienization and otherization increases. This has been the case recently with the Western world knee-deep in political, social and economic crises.