• Since the killing of Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad last week, there have been debates, questions and concerns about the potential implications of this attack on U.S. foreign policy and the international relations of the Middle East in general. The missile attacks of Iran on a base in Iraq and the debates about a Ukrainian airlines plane presumably shot down by a missile increased the level these discussions.
  • The targeted killing of Qassem Soleimani, the commander of Iran's Quds Force, an elite unit of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), and the deputy chief of Hashd al-Shaabi forces in Iraq, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandisi, is a game-changer for Middle Eastern politics. Immediately after the attack that killed Soleimani, Iranian leadership threatened the U.S. and its allies in the region. Iran fired missiles at two American bases in Iraq in retaliation to the assassination of Soleimani. No casualties were declared in Iran's retaliatory attacks. Leaders of both countries escalated the tension, but they were careful not to let the crisis get out of control.
  • Trump's Iran policy completely differs from the former U.S. administration's as it contains the possibility of both winning or losing in the region

Bu Konuda Daha Fazla

  • The killing of Qasem Soleimani and his close associates in an American airstrike in Baghdad Thursday night was without question one of the most significant developments in the Middle East over the last several years – significant in terms of the profile of its target as well as the unexpectedness of such an attack.

  • Discussions over President Donald Trump’s impeachment started as soon as he walked into the Oval Office in 2017. There were several reasons but the most important was the possibility that Russia may have interfered in the 2016 Presidential elections helping Trump to become the 45th U.S. president.

  • The U.S. Senate passed a resolution on Thursday recognizing the so-called Armenian genocide. The measure, which President Donald Trump's allies in the Senate had repeatedly blocked, is not legally binding. It is merely a symbolic step. For the resolution, which Turkey strongly condemned, to become law, it must be adopted by the House of Representatives and signed by President Trump.

  • The U.S. Congress, acting under the influences of anti-Turkey sentiment in Washington, is back in the game.

  • Ankara and Washington should work together to overcome mutual problems and the U.S. needs to respect Turkey's national security concerns, experts said Wednesday.