Talha Köse

Researcher, Strategy, İstanbul
A graduate of the Political Science and International Relations Department of Boğaziçi University, Mr. Köse received his MA in the Conflict Analyses and Solutions Program from Sabancı University. Köse holds a PhD from the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, with the thesis titled “Re-Negotiating Alevi Identity: Conflict and Cooperation Narratives and the Constitution of New Alevi Identity”. Köse worked as an RA at SETA and as a research coordinator later at SETA-Washington. Köse is currently a faculty member at Istanbul Şehir University.

Directors

  • NATO leaders met in London at a time of uncertainty for the U.K. While the public and British authorities are overwhelmed with the debates on Brexit and getting ready for the parliamentary elections to be held next week, the NATO leaders' summit was held in the British capital to make landmark decisions for the future of the alliance. NATO is celebrating the 70th anniversary of its establishment, and the defense alliance was in search of a new vision and updated agenda.
  • A lack of democracy, shady hustles and disunity. The main opposition CHP actively embraces what a successful party would avoid
  • There is an emerging trend of popular protests all over the world. Citizens who are disenchanted by the conventional political system and procedures hit the streets to express their political and economic demands, or at least express their frustrations more vociferously. Especially the younger generations, who are less interested in regular electoral politics, have shown political consciousness in such a distinctive context.
  • There were too many controversial issues on the table in President Erdoğan’s recent visit to Washington and the meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump. Washington's continuing support for the People's Protection Units (YPG); the S-400 missiles; the situation with the F-35 fighter jets; Washington’s policy on the Gülenist Terror Group (FETÖ) and other sanction bills against Turkey are urgent issues for Turkey that need to be tackled constructively by the American authorities. Only a reset in Turkish-American relations can assure a significant change, but the circumstances are not conducive to a reset. For the moment the Democratic Union Party (PYD) issue seems to be the biggest problem leading to constant tensions between the two countries.
  • Turkish-American relations are experiencing the heavy burden of Washington's alliance with the People's Protection Units (YPG), as the YPG is the Syrian branch of the PKK terrorist group, which Turkey has been struggling against for the last four decades. This vision will not change any time soon despite Washington's denial of the PKK-YPG connection. There are many other significant obstacles to the normalization of Turkish-American relations but Washington's flirt with the YPG is the most controversial one.